Gary Arseneau - Deception: Are These Really Rodins?


COLLEGE ART ASSOCIATION 

The Association of Art Museum Directors endorses the College Art Associationís April 27, 1974 Statement on Standards for Sculptural Reproduction and Preventive Measures to Combat Unethical Casting in Bronze. 

In the College Art Associationís Ethics & Guidelines under the subtitle Unauthorized Translation Into New Materials it states: 

"A more complex problem of sculptural reproduction occurs when the artistís heirs or executors cast his work in a new medium other than that clearly intended by the artist for the final version of his work. This would be the case when an artistís work was originally carved in wood or stone and then posthumously cast in bronze. In the absence of authorization from the artist this form of moulage should be rejected as unethical." It continues by stating: "All bronze casting from finished bronzes, all unauthorized enlargements, and all transfers into new materials, unless specifically condoned by the artist, all works cast as a result of being in the public domain should be considered as inauthentic or counterfeit. Unauthorized casts of works in the public domain cannot be looked upon as accurate presentations of the artistís achievement. Accordingly, in the absence of relevant laws and for moral reasons, such works should: -- Not be acquired by museums or exhibited as works of art." 

The College Art Association also recommends: 

"all transfers into new materials, unless specifically condoned by the artist--should be considered inauthentic and counterfeit." and "in absence of relevant laws and for moral reason, such work should: 1. Not be sold by art dealers or auctioneers. 2. Not be acquired by museums or exhibited as works of art. 3. Not be cast by foundries. 4. Be clearly identified for what they are by art historians and critics who may write about them." and the CAA recommends: "Artists, scholars, critics and dealers should give all possible assistance in exposing the described abuses." 

When anyone posthumously reproduces an object and fails to disclose it as a reproduction, should we not speak out against such abuses? 

When anyone posthumously applies a counterfeit signature to an object, should we not speak out against such abuses? 

When a cultural institution or museum exhibits these posthumously reproduced objects with counterfeit signatures applied as "sculptures" and/or as "signed" by the artist, should we not speak out against such abuses? 

 

 

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